The Transhumanist – We Need To Achieve Symbiosis With Machines

Bring in the Artifical Intelligence

Artificial Intelligence is a technology and it’s in our culture for years before we thought it was attainable. However, it is a lot more than just a sci-fi culture. Now it is reality…

But, what is A.I. ?

Artificial intelligence (AI) is the intelligence exhibited by machines. It’s an ideal “intelligent” machine and it’s a flexible rational agent that perceives its environment and takes actions that maximize its chance of success at an arbitrary goal. Colloquially, the term “artificial intelligence” is likely to be applied when a machine uses cutting-edge techniques to competently perform or mimic “cognitive” functions that we intuitively associate with human minds, such as “learning” and “problem solving“. The colloquial connotation, especially among the public, associates artificial intelligence with machines that are “cutting-edge”.

This is where billionaire inventor and engineer Elon Musk steps in.

According to him (and many other experts), an era of Artificial Intelligence could quite possibly spell the end times for humanity. Artificial Intelligence is predicted to outpace humanity at an unprecedented rate, having them look at us adoringly as house pets at best or just doing away with us at worst. These predictions have pushed Musk to suggest something daringly unconventional and almost controversial: The neural lace.

The neural lace is a device that is intended to grow with your brain. Its major purpose is to optimize mental output through a brain-computer interface, effortlessly accessing the internet just through singular thoughts.

Musk explaining the neural lace at the 2016 Code Conference:

 

Ironically, by becoming one with A.I.

By placing the neural lace as a layer above our brains, the playing field becomes even. While the computing  powers of A.I. is expected to surpass that of humans greatly, the neural lace is expected to push our cognitive performance levels to one that is comparable to that of A.I. But all of this contingent on how society perceives placing a mesh covering atop of their cortex.

While many fear invasive surgery that would require their heads to be split open, there is another, slightly less intimate alternative: injections. Trials with wired neural mesh have already gone underway on mice, confirming that a syringe is a potentially viable mode of implantation. However, we are years away from anything close to what Musk was suggesting.

But here’s to waiting long hours at the doctor’s office sometime down the line for that neural lace.

Eric Schmidt says…

If you’re terrified by artificial intelligence outsmarting and then wiping out humanity, you’ve watched too many movies, Schmidt told a panel at Symposium Stockholm on Thursday.

On the possibility of an artificial superintelligence trying to destroy mankind in the near future, Schmidt added:

The scenario you’re just describing is the one where the computers get so smart is that they want to destroy us at some point in their evolving intelligence due to some bug. My question to you is: don’t you think the humans would notice this, and start turning off the computers? We’d have a race between humans turning off computers, and the AI relocating itself to other computers, in this mad race to the last computer, and we can’t turn it off, and that’s a movie. It’s a movie. The state of the earth currently does not support any of these scenarios.

“The state of the art doesn’t support any of these scenarios. It’s just speculation,” Schmidt said.

Schmidt said while both Hawking and Musk are brilliant minds, neither is a computer scientist. Hawking is a physicist and Musk is an engineer, he noted.

 

Our goal is to get to the point where everyone has an assistant

He also suggested Google has not developed AI to a level that is anywhere close to surpassing human intelligence.

“We’re still trying to learn how to deal with games,” Schmidt said, referring to Google’s AlphaGo victory over Go grandmaster Lee Se-dol.

“It’s a big leap from that to the scenarios you see in movies,” he said.

 

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Tommy Lambert Written by: